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Flexible Horseshoes

Flexible Horseshoes by Nanoflex, Inc.

horseshoes horse pain

Nanoflex, flexible horseshoes are the premier nano composite footwear developed for the wellness, agility, speed as well as longevity of your equine. Our footwear are developed to benefit any type of steed by utilizing high tech nano polyurethane materials to create a shoe which can flex with the hoof. It is constructed for softer pad on the sole side to supply healthful all-natural support while staying clear of any type of pressure points on the frog or sole of the hooves.

Time examined and also designed to benefit long term use on horses in all pursuits, from International efficiency and also race equines, to trail equines.

Backed by research study and also solid design concepts supported by over 15 years of evidence-based soundness.

Engineered for balanced versatility.

The Nanoflex, versatile horseshoe system has been very successful for efficiency horses, but is likewise the most effective option for restorative situations– laminitis, navicular syndrome, as well as other hoof pathologies. Steeds of all self-controls have tried as well as enjoyed the Nanoflex, versatile horseshoes. Whether it be a western event, dressage, path, endurance, eventing, ranching, or just a pleasure trip; the Nanoflex, flexible horseshoes provides an equine unmatched comfort by simulating the conditions under which steeds would naturally keep their hooves.

Company Information:

Name: John Filipelli

Email: sales@nanoflexinc.com

Organization: Nanoflex, Inc.

Address: South Florida Trotting Center: 7563 State Road 7, Lake Worth FL 33449, USA

Phone: (954) 857-6337

Monday

8AM–7PM

Tuesday

8AM–7PM

Wednesday

8AM–7PM

Thursday

8AM–7PM

Friday

8AM–7PM

Saturday

10AM–5PM

Sunday

12AM–5PM


Horse Hoof Care - No Hoof, No Horse

Easy Boot Glove

There are a lot of blogs on horseshoeing on the internet. What typically takes place on the blogs is quite a bit of arguing, it's as if the industry itself can not come to terms with each other. It's whether or not horses should only go barefoot or whether they should be shod. It's whether or not this style over that style of shoeing is correct compared to the other. Obviously there is a reason for the differences. The industry still struggles for the truth.

One particular blog post was all about a negative opinion of the Natural Balance shoe. The Natural Balance shoe was developed with many aspects of shoeing taken together as a whole. 1. The shoe has wide side bars which help protect the sensitive sole of the horse. 2. The toe of the shoe is rather square which helps stabilize the foot going forward on the ground (travel). The toe area of the shoe also has a very wide web which protects the most subject area to soreness of the foot after trimming - the toe. And finally the shoe has a built in rocker at the toe to aid break over thereby reducing stresses within the fetlock joints and coffin.

It's all about education. The blog posters negative remarks about natural balance shoes were that the square toe showed a wear pattern that was directly across the outside square point of the shoe rather than directly center of the square toe. The argument was the horse had to walk on this "Point" of the shoe which would have no stability until the horse wore the point off the shoe during use. The blog poster is actually moving in the right direction of discovering for him self more truth about shoeing by recognizing wear patterns of shoes. Of course wear pattern is something that should be observed. He was being astute.

However, this is where the lack of education of the poster making the remark starts. It's not a problem of the shoe if the wear pattern is diagonal rather than straight. The problem lies with the horse being Pigeon Toed. The problem with the blog poster assuming he or she was a farrier is that he or she does not know how to correct a pigeon toed foot. With more education and a deeper understanding of horse anatomy and how to correct a pigeon toed foot the Natural Balance shoe can be positioned in a way that the wear pattern of the shoe would be correct. The result is a foot with protection, stability, and ease of break over.

Now this is where the Farrier industry is still behind the learning curve. What's not being taught in the schools is the correct way to address pigeon toed horses. What is being taught in the schools will actually ruin a horse. Textbook information requires the Farrier to lower one side of the foot over the other to force the foot into a more conformational correct position. Problem with this is it forces twist and bind into the horses joint at the coffin bone and both pastern bones fostering a tremendous risk of lameness.

The blog posters comments are going in the right direction but lack the complete picture. It also reflects the Farrier industry/schools are not up to speed thereby the truth is not common place within the practice. The good news is the truth about the correct way to handle these problems is available. It's the result of years of scientific study and breakthrough understandings. If you are looking for the truth and the way to promise your horse it's safety and soundness you should seek the truth out. The very last thing horses deserve is permanent lameness due to our lack of education of horseshoeing.

Ask your Farrier or any Farrier how does he fix the condition of a horse being pigeon toed or toed out. If he or she tells you that it's an easy fix all that's necessary is to lower one side of the foot opposite the other side then you know you are putting your horse at risk and you are heading for trouble. You should seek out more information at that point.