Plastic Horseshoes For Horses in Nevada

Plastic Horseshoes

Information on Horseshoes For Dressage Horses in  Nevada

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Horseshoe Studs, Caulks or Calks are metal devices that are screwed or driven into the bottom of your horse's shoes. By protruding from the bottom of the shoe, they can help to provide traction over muddy or deep footing, such as sand, and help your horse jump more confidently.

Before using studs, holes are "tapped," or drilled, into both heels, and sometimes the toes, of the horse's shoe. Obviously the size of the hole must accommodate the stud and generally in the US, farriers will tap a hole that supports a 3/8" diameter stud. Therefore, unless you have a special requirement for a smaller hole, such as a pony with very small feet, you should try to stick with 3/8' studs.

The first time you ride your horse with studs you should fit him with some small road studs and let him walk around unmounted for a while to get used to the new feeling (this does not mean turn him out in a field with studs in - horses should never be turned out in studs!)

Here are some simple rules for using studs. These relate to "screw-in" studs rather than "drive-in" studs because screw-in studs are by far the most commonly used types.


Do's: o ALWAYS use studs in pairs, with one on each side of the hoof.

o ALWAYS use small, blunt studs on the inside of your horse's shoes. A large, pointed stud can injure him.

o ALWAYS put protective leg boots on your horse when riding in studs.

o ALWAYS put studs in just before you will be riding and remove them as soon as possible afterwards.

o ALWAYS use the smallest stud you can, considering the conditions. While slipping is dangerous for your horse, a little slipping is much better than jarring your horse's legs with huge studs. Try to find a stud that allows a little slipping, but not so much that your horse's balance will suffer. Studs should be selected that will sink fully into the ground, otherwise they will unbalance the foot.

o ALWAYS try to have someone help you by holding your horse when you are putting studs in, especially if you will be using a Tee Tap (see below).

o ALWAYS be very careful if you have a horse that is likely to kick out at other horses or people. If you have such a horse, try to limit the amount of time you use studs.



Dont's: o NEVER turn your horse out with studs.

o NEVER leave your horse unattended in a stall with studs.

o NEVER trailer your horse with studs.

o NEVER use studs if your horse is lame.

o NEVER put yourself in a position where a horse with studs in can step on you. It is very easy to break a toe this way, even in riding boots.


Your Stud "Toolkit" Ahead of time, you should assemble the following items:
o A selection of studs. Remember that depending on the footing, you might not use the same studs on the inside and outside of your horse's shoes, or you could use different studs on the front than the back shoes. o A horseshoe nail or some type of flat but pointed "pick" to remove stud plugs. Screwdrivers are generally not suitable as they tend to be too "fat" to fit between the plug and the shoe.

o A stud hole cleaner. This is used to remove any debris from the stud hole. Some people use the horseshoe nail for this, but there are many specially-designed tools that will work faster.

o A tap of some type. This is used to clean and sharpen the edges of the threads your farrier drilled into the stud holes. There are many types on the market. The traditional type is a Tee Tap or T-Tap, so named because it is the shape of the letter "T". Recently round "Safety" Taps have become available on the market. These are safer because if your horse steps down on a Tee Tap it can cause an injury whereas a Safety Tap is less likely to cause a problem because it is flat and shaped like a hoof. There are some self-tapping studs starting to come onto the market that should remove the need for a separate Tap, however it is still a good idea to keep a Tap on hand.

o A wrench. This is used to tighten and then remove the studs. You can use a regular adjustable wrench found in most toolkits, although over time the wrench may wear the edges of your studs, making them difficult to use. There are also a number of special wrenches made specifically for horse studs. Even if you use a purpose-made wrench, it is probably not a bad idea to have an adjustable one too.

o A box to keep everything in one place! Studs have a notorious "homing" instinct and will disappear at the smallest opportunity. If you don't capture them in a box, you will never find them again next time you need them.

o Rags or a small sponge. For removing oil or grease from your studs (assuming you oiled and stored them correctly the last time you used them) Studs are definitely slippery when greasy and will jump on this opportunity as part of their escape plan!

The following items are also nice to have: o A magnet for your arm or a magnetic dish. This is useful for keeping steel studs in one place while you work and will reduce the possibility of your studs escaping! o Rubber or cotton plugs or blanks. Most people put plugs in their stud holes when they are not using studs. This keeps the holes clean. There are rubber and cotton plugs and also metal stud blanks. If you use cotton plugs, soak them in oil to prevent the holes rusting. Stud blanks are metal screw-in plugs. If you use these, you will also need a....

o Blank Wrench or Flat-Head Screwdriver. A Blank Wrench is an Allen Key and is inserted into the stud blank to screw the blank in and out of the stud hole. Some stud blanks are designed to be inserted and removed using a Flat Head Screwdriver instead of a Blank Wrench.

o Stud cleaner and lubricant. Your studs will last much longer if you clean and grease them after use. Many people wrap them in an oily rag for storage, or you can use a product such as WD-40. Pretty much anything that repels water will work. There are also specially made stud cleaners available on the market.


Putting Studs in Ideally you should take a lesson from your farrier or trainer before attempting to put studs in yourself. Make sure you and your horse practice at home, until you can put them in and take them out easily, before using them at a competition. If your horse has plugs in his stud holes you will need to remove these first with your horseshoe nail or other implement.


HINT: It is a good idea to take the plugs out, clean the holes and replace the plugs before you leave for a competition. There is nothing more frustrating than not being able to remove a plug when you only have 10 minutes until you should be warming up your horse!Next you will need to clean out the stud hole with whatever tool you have chosen. Make sure that you remove all traces of dirt and debris. Putting studs into dirty stud holes can ruin the threads on your horse's shoes. Then (unless you are using self-tapping studs) you will need to tap the stud hole with a Safety Tap or Tee Tap. Unless you have a very quiet, experienced horse and are experienced with studs, we recommend using a Safety Tap. Basically, you will place the end of the Tap into the stud hole and screw it into the hole. Another benefit of a Safety Tap is that you can't screw the Tap in too far and potentially bruise your horse's hoof, which is possible with a Tee Tap.


HINT: Self-tapping studs are a new option where the stud has a special thread that will clean the threads on your horse's shoes as you insert it. Because they are new, these studs are more expensive than traditional studs, but as long as you don't lose them, they could be a great timesaving investment. Now you can insert the studs. Begin by screwing them in by hand and finally make them nice and tight with your wrench. Be sure that you don't over-tighten them so that you can't undo them after you finish riding!When you are finished riding, remove the studs, plug the holes and store the studs in some form of oily rag or plastic bag with a water repellent - any kind of oil, grease or WD-40 will work. Make sure you keep some rags or a sponge on hand to wipe up the grease! Put your studs back in their box - if you don't they WILL escape!!! And don't forget to have a great ride!

For more information on types of studs and when to use them, please visit www.StudsAndStuff.com

# 1 – What are Nanoflex Horseshoes, and how do they function?

Nanoflex Horseshoes are a shapable polyurethane straight glue on shoe that resembles the natural make-up as well as put on qualities of the hoof. Our footwear are commonly used in performance and also restorative situations as an alternative application with horses that become unresponsive to conventional shoeing techniques.

With their capability to resemble the technician residential or commercial properties of the foot – Nanoflex Horseshoes boost the feature of the hoof, instead of limiting it. This commonly leads to a much more comfortable equine with healthier development.

# 2 – What are the benefits of Nanoflex shoes?

Nanoflex footwear supply several advantages for the steed. Most typically, we listen to customers describing the shoes ability to operate as an all-natural extension of the unguis as the most desirable attribute. The direct glue application together with the shoe’s composition are thought to preserve the regular hoof features of assistance, traction, shock absorption as well as proprioception by bending with the unguis.

In our opinion, traditional adhesive on footwear over long term use tend to reverse the preliminary benefits attained because of the casting nature of an inflexible footwear. In contrast, our observations have found Nanoflex shoes to be successful for long term use and also appear to produce much healthier horn development.

# 3 – How much time will the Nanoflex shoes last?

Nanoflex Horseshoes are created to have the same or comparable life expectancy as typical footwear. We advise shoeing your horse according to the ordinary cycle of 4-6 weeks, based on their personal demands.

# 4 – Are Nanoflex footwear much more costly than conventional shoes?

Yes. The moment it takes to produce our shoes, in addition to the materials as well as craftsmanship required for the application procedure makes Nanoflex Horseshoes a true investment.

# 5 – What makes an equine an excellent prospect for Nanoflex horseshoes?

Under our “Shoes” tab, you will certainly find “Selecting A Candidate” alternative in the drop down menu. If you see this web page you will certainly find a comprehensive description of the 4 main factors we take into consideration before determining if a horse is a Nanoflex prospect.

Company Information:

Name: John Filipelli

Email: sales@nanoflexinc.com

Organization: Nanoflex, Inc.

Address: South Florida Trotting Center: 7563 State Road 7, Lake Worth FL 33449, USA

Phone: (954) 857-6337

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8AM–7PM

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8AM–7PM

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Find Horseshoes For Dressage Horses in the State of Nevada


Where to find information about Horseshoes For Dressage Horses in Nevada

Horse Birthday Party Ideas to Help You Create the "Mane" Event!

horseshoes for miniature horses

There are a lot of blogs on horseshoeing on the internet. What typically takes place on the blogs is quite a bit of arguing, it's as if the industry itself can not come to terms with each other. It's whether or not horses should only go barefoot or whether they should be shod. It's whether or not this style over that style of shoeing is correct compared to the other. Obviously there is a reason for the differences. The industry still struggles for the truth.

One particular blog post was all about a negative opinion of the Natural Balance shoe. The Natural Balance shoe was developed with many aspects of shoeing taken together as a whole. 1. The shoe has wide side bars which help protect the sensitive sole of the horse. 2. The toe of the shoe is rather square which helps stabilize the foot going forward on the ground (travel). The toe area of the shoe also has a very wide web which protects the most subject area to soreness of the foot after trimming - the toe. And finally the shoe has a built in rocker at the toe to aid break over thereby reducing stresses within the fetlock joints and coffin.

It's all about education. The blog posters negative remarks about natural balance shoes were that the square toe showed a wear pattern that was directly across the outside square point of the shoe rather than directly center of the square toe. The argument was the horse had to walk on this "Point" of the shoe which would have no stability until the horse wore the point off the shoe during use. The blog poster is actually moving in the right direction of discovering for him self more truth about shoeing by recognizing wear patterns of shoes. Of course wear pattern is something that should be observed. He was being astute.

However, this is where the lack of education of the poster making the remark starts. It's not a problem of the shoe if the wear pattern is diagonal rather than straight. The problem lies with the horse being Pigeon Toed. The problem with the blog poster assuming he or she was a farrier is that he or she does not know how to correct a pigeon toed foot. With more education and a deeper understanding of horse anatomy and how to correct a pigeon toed foot the Natural Balance shoe can be positioned in a way that the wear pattern of the shoe would be correct. The result is a foot with protection, stability, and ease of break over.

Now this is where the Farrier industry is still behind the learning curve. What's not being taught in the schools is the correct way to address pigeon toed horses. What is being taught in the schools will actually ruin a horse. Textbook information requires the Farrier to lower one side of the foot over the other to force the foot into a more conformational correct position. Problem with this is it forces twist and bind into the horses joint at the coffin bone and both pastern bones fostering a tremendous risk of lameness.

The blog posters comments are going in the right direction but lack the complete picture. It also reflects the Farrier industry/schools are not up to speed thereby the truth is not common place within the practice. The good news is the truth about the correct way to handle these problems is available. It's the result of years of scientific study and breakthrough understandings. If you are looking for the truth and the way to promise your horse it's safety and soundness you should seek the truth out. The very last thing horses deserve is permanent lameness due to our lack of education of horseshoeing.

Ask your Farrier or any Farrier how does he fix the condition of a horse being pigeon toed or toed out. If he or she tells you that it's an easy fix all that's necessary is to lower one side of the foot opposite the other side then you know you are putting your horse at risk and you are heading for trouble. You should seek out more information at that point.